What is cholesterol and how to treat it_

What is cholesterol, and what effect does it have on your health?

How Does Cholesterol Affect You?

Cholesterol is certainly a word you’ve heard before, but you’re not sure what it means. Cholesterol is a waxy kind of fat or lipid that circulates in your bloodstream throughout your body. Lipids are molecules that do not dissolve in water but do in blood. Cholesterol is made by the body, but it can also be taken via diet. Cholesterol is only found in plant-based foods.

What function does cholesterol play in our bodies?

Cholesterol is necessary by every cell in the body because it aids in the formation of cell membrane layers. These layers operate as gatekeepers for which items are allowed to enter and depart the cell, protecting the contents. It’s made by the liver, and it’s frequently used by the liver to make bile, which is what makes you eat. Cholesterol is also required for the synthesis of vitamin D and the creation of certain hormones. The amount of cholesterol produced by your liver is sufficient to meet the body’s needs for these critical functions. High cholesterol might also cause erectile dysfunction.

Cholesterol subtypes

Low-density lipoprotein is one of the two major lipoproteins (LDL). Low-density lipoprotein (LDL) is sometimes referred to as “bad cholesterol.” High-density lipoprotein is the other primary lipoprotein (HDL). High-density lipoprotein (HDL) is sometimes referred to as “good cholesterol.” VLDLs (very low-density lipoproteins) are blood particles that are high in triglycerides.

What exactly is HDL (high-density lipoprotein)?

“Healthy cholesterol” is referred to as HDL. Other forms of cholesterol (such as LDL) are transported away from the artery, which is helpful. It might help us imagine HDL as a delivery truck and LDL as a dump truck. HDL eliminates cholesterol from the bloodstream by extracting it from other liver sources. Higher HDL levels have been linked to a lower risk of heart disease.

LDL (low-density lipoprotein) is a kind of cholesterol.

Because we still hear about how to lower our cholesterol levels, you might find it interesting that low-density lipoprotein is still referred to as bad cholesterol. LDL is “bad” regardless of what it does. By accumulating on the walls of your arteries, LDL can thin them. Fatty deposits form plaque in your arteries, which can impede them. The build-up is referred as as atherosclerosis. The blood vessels that deliver oxygen-rich blood from your heart to the rest of your body’s organs are known as arteries. Saturated and trans fats are two types of fats associated to elevated levels of LDL cholesterol and should be avoided in your diet. Saturated fats are solid or waxy at normal temperature.

Which type of cholesterol test are you referring to?

Every five years, everyone over the age of 20 should have their cholesterol levels examined. The healthcare professional will arrange a blood test to evaluate how much cholesterol is carried in the bloodstream. Your cholesterol levels will be revealed by this test. The supplier may request a lipid panel, commonly known as a lipid profile. The following numbers have been assigned to you by the panel:

  • Cholesterol total.
  • LDL cholesterol levels
  • HDL levels are important.
  • Triglycerides and VLDL levels
  • Cholesterol that isn’t HDL.
  • The proportion of cholesterol to HDL.

What factors affect cholesterol levels?

  • Diet: Foods high in saturated fat, trans fat, and cholesterol raise your cholesterol levels. Reduce your consumption of saturated fat, trans fat, and cholesterol. This will help you lower your cholesterol levels in your blood. The effects of saturated and trans fats on blood cholesterol are the most significant.
  • Weight: Obesity can boost triglyceride levels in addition to being a risk factor for heart disease. Losing weight can help lower triglyceride levels while also increasing HDL levels.
  • Exercise: Regular exercise can help lower total cholesterol levels. Exercise is the most effective way to decrease triglycerides and raise HDL levels. On most days of the week, you should try to be physically active for 30 minutes.
  • Age and Sex: Our cholesterol levels climb as we get older. Women appear to have lower total cholesterol concentrations before to menopause than men of the same age. LDL levels in women begin to climb after menopause, whereas HDL levels decrease.

What is the most effective strategy to manage high cholesterol ?

Dietary modifications, medicine, or a combination of the two are all options for lowering high blood cholesterol (total cholesterol). The healthcare provider can help you decide which drug (or combination of drugs) is best for you.

Changing your lifestyle

Wherever possible, healthcare experts aim to start with the least invasive interventions, such as lifestyle changes. The following instructions will be given to you:

  • Stop Tobacco: If you smoke at all, you should quit. Smoking is harmful in a number of ways, one of which is lowering the amount of good cholesterol in the body.
  • Adjust the way of eating: Dietary modifications, medicine, or a combination of the two are all options for lowering high blood cholesterol (total cholesterol). The healthcare provider can help you decide which drug (or combination of drugs) is best for you.
  • Get further experience: Wherever possible, healthcare experts aim to start with the least invasive interventions, such as lifestyle changes. The following instructions will be given to you:
  • To sustain a good weight: If you smoke at all, you should quit. Smoking is harmful in a number of ways, diabetes one of which is lowering the amount of good cholesterol in the body.

Treatment for high cholesterol can be done in a variety of ways. For further information, speak with your doctor.

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